Lammers_Joris_SW

Personen

Joris Lammers

Publikationen (seit 2014)

In Press

Lammers, J., Koch, A., Conway, P. & Brandt, M. J. (in press).

"The Political Domain Appears Simpler to the Politically Extreme Than to Political Moderates." Social Psychological and Personality Science.
2017

Lammers, J. & Burgmer, P. 2017.

"Power Increases Anchoring Effects On Judgment." Social Cognition, 35(1).

Lammers, J. & Gast, A. 2017.

"Stressing the Advantages of Female Leadership Can Place Women at a Disadvantage." Social Psychology, 48, 28-39.

Lammers, J., Dubois, D., Rucker, D. D. & Galinsky, A. D. 2017.

"Ease of Retrieval Moderates the Effects of Power: Implications for the Replicability of Power Recall Effects." Social Cognition, 35(1), 1-17.
2016

Baldwin, M. & Lammers, J. 2016.

"Past-Focused Environmental Comparisons Promote Proenvironmental Outcomes for Conservatives." PNAS, 113(52), 14953-14957.

Lammers, J. & Maner, J. 2016.

"Power and Attraction to the Counternormative Aspects of Infidelity." Journal of Sex Research, 53(1), 54-63.

Lammers, J. & Imhoff, R. 2016.

"Power and Sadomasochism: Understanding the Antecedents of a Knotty Relationship.” Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1-7, 142-148.

Lammers, J., Stoker, J. I., Rink, F. & Galinsky, A. D. 2016.

"To Have Control Over or to Be Free From Others? The Desire for Power Reflects a Need for Autonomy." Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 42(4), 498-512.
2015

De Waal-Andrews, W., Gregg, A. P. & Lammers, J. 2015.

"When Status is Grabbed and when Status is Granted: Getting Ahead in Dominance and Prestige Hierarchies." British Journal of Social Psychology, 54(3), 445-464.

Galinsky, A., Lammers, J., Dubois, D. & Rucker, D.D. 2015.

"Power and Morality." Current Opinion in Psychology, 6, 15-19.

Inbar, Y. & Lammers, J. 2015.

"Increasing Ideological Tolerance in Social Psychology [Peer Commentary on “Political Diversity Will Improve Social Psychological Science” by J. L. Duarte et al.]." Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 38, 147-148.

Lammers, J., Galinsky, A. D., Dubois, D. & Rucker, D. D. 2015.

"Power and Morality." Current Opinion in Psychology, 6, 15-19.

Meijs, M., Lammers, J. & Ratliff, K. A. 2015.

"Gender Stereotype-Inconsistent Acts Are Seen as More Acceptable Than Stereotype-Consistent Acts, if They Are Clever." Social Psychology, 46, 291-305.
2014

Lammers, J. & Van Beest, I. 2014.

"The Effects of Power on Immorality." In: J.-W. Van Prooijen & P. A. M. Van Lange (Eds.), Power, Politics, and Paranoia: Why People are Suspicious of Their Leaders, 17–32. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

In den Medien

Los Angeles Times, 12.12.2016 | Melissa Healy

„But to conservative ears, says a study published Monday in the journal PNAS, policy recommendations on the environment might sound more appealing if they’re aimed at restoring a known and beloved past than if they’re required to forestall disasters in an uncertain future.[…] Baldwin and Lammers write, the message of climate change has been framed in many ways — from fatalistic predictions about the future to calls for social progress[…].“

Link zum Artikel: http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-environmental-messaging-conservative-20161212-story.html

Quirks & Quarks, 17.12.2016 | Bob McDonald

„Psychologist Dr. Matthew Baldwin and colleagues at the University of Cologne, in Germany, have considered how re-framing language around climate change increases its appeal for specific parts of the population. In a new study, Baldwin has found that Americans who are politically conservative and tend to be skeptical about climate change, are more likely to be persuaded by statements that connect climate change with a cherished, idyllic past. In contrast, liberals, or progressives, respond to both ‚past-focused‘ messages and to appeals that talk about the future.“

Link zum Artikel: http://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/head-transplants-weed-research-flaws-fake-news-1.3897675/how-to-convince-a-conservative-climate-change-skeptic-1.3897742

New York Magazine, 31.03.2016 | Melissa Dahl

„You’ve been offered a promotion. […] There is, however, a teensy catch: Your new title doesn’t actually come with any more money than your current one. But think of the prestige — the power! So. Will you take it? No, you most likely would not [ …]. Across nine experiments, the researchers — from the University of Cologne, the University of Groningen, and Columbia University — consistently found that, although employees without a lot of power do indeed desire more of it, ultimately ‘gaining autonomy quenches the desire for power’. […] In one experiment, the researchers — led by Joris Lammers at the University of Cologne — guided people through the above thought experiment.”

Link zum Artikel: http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/03/all-anyone-really-wants-at-work-is-autonomy.html

The Guardian, 26.11.2014 | Emine Saner

„Research indicates that the mere suggestion someone has acquired new power makes them behave antisocially and eat more messily. […] A study by two researchers, Joris Lammers and Adam Galinsky, split 105 people into two groups and asked each to recall an instance in which they had power.”

Link zum Artikel: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/nov/26/high-pitched-voices-powers-research-antisocial